Converting from Chapter 7 to Chapter 13: What’s Involved and Why Would You Convert?

Conversion to Chapter 13 from Chapter 7 isn’t a death sentence for your bankruptcy case (see Chapter 13: Not Always a Gloomy Diagnosis in Bankruptcy). Perhaps a Chapter 7 was filed underestimating your income and you didn’t actually qualify for Chapter 7 for this reason. Or perhaps you realize after filing your Chapter 7 that you have mortgage arrears that you wish to repay in order to save your home from foreclosure, which is something that you cannot do in Chapter 7. Or perhaps you discover after already filing Chapter 7 that you have non-exempt assets which you would rather ‘pay to keep’ in Chapter 13 rather than turn over to the Chapter 7 trustee for immediate liquidation. Also, conversion can arise when the Office of the United States Trustee brings a motion to dismiss your Chapter 7 case for abuse, usually citing that you did not qualify for Chapter 7 from the beginning. While converting to Chapter 13 is neither an everyday experience nor a great risk for the average debtor, it can arise and ideally your attorney has already explained the differences between Chapter 13 and Chapter 7.

What can you expect if you convert to Chapter 7 from Chapter 13:

  • File and sign new petition forms and amended schedules required for the verified conversion.
  • Formulate a Chapter 13 plan with your attorney. The plan will propose a monthly Chapter 13 payment to commence about one month after the conversion is filed and continue for three to five years. From this payment, mortgage arrears and priority tax claims can be paid off over three to five years, vehicle loans may be crammed down to the value of the vehicle rather than the pre-petition balance of the loan, and other terms can be written into your plan that are more versatile than can be achieved in Chapter 7.
  • Attendance at the Chapter 13 Meeting of Creditors. You will need to attend a Meeting of Creditors with the Chapter 13 trustee even if you have already attended a Chapter 7 Meeting of Creditors.
  • Additional attorney fees. Chapter 13 almost always costs more than Chapter 7, in large part due to the attorney work necessary to formulate a Chapter 13 plan and for the fact that your bankruptcy attorney continues to represent you throughout the entire three to five-year Chapter 13 plan (versus the few months in which a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is usually completed). Many times, these fees can be paid in large part ‘through the plan’, which means the attorney fees are paid over time through the monthly plan payments you make to the Chapter 13 trustee.

Unless you recognize a change in circumstances where you voluntarily wish to convert your case, your attorney will also apprise you of any event arising in your Chapter 7 case which may require conversion to Chapter 13.

For more information on how to convert your case from Chapter 7 to Chapter 13, contact Wartchow Law Office for a free bankruptcy consultation. Located in Edina, Minnesota, Wartchow Law represents clients in all forms of bankruptcy throughout the Minneapolis and St. Paul metro area of Minnesota.

What Happens after the 341 Meeting of Creditors is Over?

The answer to this depends on whether you have filed Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. (Chapter 11 individual debtors also are required to attend a Meeting of Creditors). At a minimum and for all Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases, the debtor must take the second financial management course and file the certificate with the Bankruptcy Court. The Notice of the Meeting of Creditors will give a specific deadline for filing the certificate in a chapter 7 case (the certificate can be filed anytime up to the week prior to the discharge being received) while in chapter 13 the certificate may be filed at any time before their chapter 13 Plan is complete.

In most Chapter 7 cases, attendance at the Meeting of Creditors which occurs about one month after your case is filed, is the last active event for a debtor in a bankruptcy proceeding. Once the Chapter 7 trustee has concluded the Meeting of Creditors and determined that no additional questions or documents will be needed from the debtor, the debtor only has to complete the second financial management course and wait for their Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge to be entered by the Bankruptcy Court about two months later. A Chapter 7 case is held usually open for two months after the date of the Meeting of Creditors so that certain actions can be taken in a case. Although these post-Meeting of Creditors actions are somewhat uncommon in the garden-variety Chapter 7 case, potential actions include turnover of a non-exempt asset to the Chapter 7 trustee, a creditor objection to the discharge of a particular debt (which is a common type of adversary proceeding), motions to dismiss a case brought by the attorney for the Office of the United States Trustee, or an administrative audit of the Chapter 7 case. Your Chapter 7 attorney can advise you of the potential actions and other requirements you may expect to occur after the Meeting of Creditors in your bankruptcy case, if anything. However most of the time once the Meeting of Creditors is over, it’s just a matter of waiting for your discharge without any further action required other than completing the financial management course.

In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the Chapter 13 plan is often confirmed about one month after the Meeting of Creditors is concluded. While plan confirmation requires an additional court hearing, attendance is rarely required at the confirmation hearing and you should not plan to attend unless your attorney advises you to do so. Once confirmed, the Chapter 13 debtor must continue to make all Chapter 13 plan payments as well as any other requirements set forth under the terms of their confirmed Chapter 13 plan (such as to report any bonus income received during the plan to the Chapter 13 trustee or provide income tax returns each year). Since a Chapter 13 case will remain an active bankruptcy case while the plan is underway, there are a number of events that can arise after the Meeting of Creditors that require you’re your and your attorney’s involvement. For example if during the course of the Chapter 13 plan there are significant changes to income or expenses, your bankruptcy attorney may advise you to file a motion to convert to Chapter 7 rather than stay in Chapter 13. Also, if you move or change your address you must notify your attorney.

Located in Edina, Minnesota, Lynn Wartchow represents clients in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota.

How Are Non-Dischargeable Debts Treated in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Non-dischargeable debts are those few categories of personal liabilities which can never be discharged in either form of Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Non-dischargeable debts include most individual income taxes, many business-related taxes such as withholding tax and other trust fund taxes, domestic support obligations, spousal support/alimony and child support, debts related to fraud or fiduciary embezzlement, educational and student loans, unlisted debts and other less common types of debts. (Note that some divorce decree obligations may be dischargeable in Chapter 13.)

One of the great benefits of Chapter 13 over Chapter 7 is that certain non-dischargeable debts can be paid back over time in Chapter 13 plan, usually over five years, which can maximize a Chapter 13 debtor’s cash flow and repayment flexibility. For example in Chapter 13, you can stretch out repayment of priority debts—such as income taxes—over five years versus the standard two to three years the taxing authorities typically require outside of bankruptcy.

It’s important to note that most taxes, domestic support obligations and mortgage arrearages must be repaid in full through the Chapter 13 plan. Practically speaking, this means that the debtor’s budget must demonstrate that they afford the minimum monthly repayment required in order to repay the non-dischargeable over sixty months (in a five year plan).  Your Chapter 13 attorney can help you calculate whether repayment of the non-dischargeable debts is feasible considering your monthly income and expenses.

The flexibility of time in repaying the few categories of non-dischargeable debts is a distinct advantage to Chapter 13. Whether a debt is discharged in bankruptcy is often fact-specific and you should seek the advice of an attorney for more information specific to your circumstances.

Wartchow Law Office advises clients in Minnesota on how Chapter 13 bankruptcy can provide relief and what they can expect from a Chapter 13 plan.  Contact for a free consultation and more information on options available under Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Located in Edina, Minnesota.

 

 

Bankruptcy and Divorce: Some Payments in a Divorce Decree May be Dischargeable in Chapter 13

The rule of thumb is that bankruptcy will discharge most unsecured debts that are not taxes or domestic support obligations (which are two of the most common “non-dischargeable debts” that will survive a bankruptcy). This means that child support, domestic support owed to an ex-spouse and many taxes are never discharged in any form of bankruptcy. However a fine line can be drawn where some payment obligations in a divorce decree can still be discharged, but only in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

The divorce obligations that can be discharged in Chapter 13 bankruptcy (but not in Chapter 7) are payments that relate to property settlements such as a cash equalizer. Cash equalizers are common, for example, when there is equity in a homestead that needs to be fairly divided between the spouses when one spouse will stay on deed to the home. The general standard for discharging these types of divorce-related obligations is whether the payment is “domestic support” in nature (non-dischargeable) or is more of a property settlement (dischargeable).

In Chapter 13 cases, payments due to an ex-spouse on account of a property settlement are not allowed in the debtor’s budget since these obligations typically are considered general unsecured debt similar to a credit card. Also like a credit card, the ex-spouse can file a proof of claim in the Chapter 13 case to claim their right to receive a proportionate distribution paid to all unsecured creditors, with any amount unpaid being discharged at the end of a successfully completed Chapter 13 plan. While usually this distribution is only fraction of the amount that is owed, unsecured creditors may nonetheless file a claim.

Support obligations are never dischargeable in any form of bankruptcy and a Chapter 13 debtor will be expected to continue making these payments during the course of their Chapter 13. These include child support and domestic support owed to an ex-spouse, but not necessarily property settlements, cash equalizers and possibly other payments owed.

Located in Edina, Minnesota, Lynn Wartchow represents clients in all Chapters of bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota.

What Should I Expect at the 341 Bankruptcy Meeting of Creditors?

If you have done basic research into the bankruptcy process, you will know that about one month after filing a bankruptcy petition and schedules there will be a mandatory hearing called the “341 Meeting of Creditors”, which is named after the section of the Bankruptcy Code that requires the hearing.

Clients often ask what to expect at the Meeting of Creditors, what they should bring to the Meeting of Creditors and what creditors will be present at the Meeting of Creditors.

For most people, the Meeting of Creditors is relatively uneventful: it’s typically held at the federal courthouse in a hearing room with people who filed bankruptcy around the same date that you did and their attorneys, all waiting for their names to be called so they can sit for the few minutes of questioning by the bankruptcy trustee assigned to their case. When your name is called, you can expect to go up and sit at the hearing table across from the trustee, and then be sworn in under oath to tell the truth, to confirm your name and address and then to answer some basic yes/no questioning for several minutes. If you have fully disclosed everything to your attorney and on your bankruptcy schedules, there should be no surprises and nothing new that comes up during the Meeting of Creditors. In the vast majority of cases, the trustee’s job is routine and they blandly conduct this hearing to determine if there are any non-exempt assets and to get your required testimony on record.

What should I bring to the Meeting of Creditors? In Minnesota bankruptcy cases, you should plan to bring your driver’s license and social security card, all paystubs received since the date that your case was filed, and also a bank statement that confirms the balance in each bank account on the file date of your bankruptcy case. If the trustee wants more documentation, they will either request it at the Meeting of Creditors or from your attorney.

Who shows up at the Meeting of Creditors? Usually, just you, your attorney and the bankruptcy trustee are present for a Meeting of Creditors. It is rare that any creditor will appear for a Meeting of Creditors, even though all creditors will receive notice of the scheduled time and date at least 21 days prior to the hearing. However, the only creditors who typically show up are ex-spouses or ex-business partners that feel jilted by the bankruptcy or, in some rare cases, individuals who have something to reveal to the trustee that was may not have been fully disclosed in the bankruptcy petition and schedules. Rarely does an everyday unsecured creditor make an appearance at the Meeting of Creditors. Even if a creditor or other party-in-interest shows up for the Meeting of Creditors, they are only allowed to ask questions related to the information contained in the schedules and are not allowed to use the Meeting of Creditors as an opportunity to ask unrelated questions.

Many people understandably feel nervous about their upcoming Meeting of Creditors, and inevitably all feel much relief once it is favorably concluded without incident. As long as you have fully disclosed all information in your petition and to your attorney, and you have the required documents and IDs on the hearing date, then the Meeting of Creditors should pose no concern. If you still feel anxious, just ask your attorney to spend a little more time helping you prepare for the Meeting of Creditors and/or provide a list of the sample questions asked at the Meeting of Creditors.

Keep reading for the Typical Questions Asked at the Chapter 7 Meeting of Creditors

Wartchow Law Office is a bankruptcy law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with  an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law,  representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

What is the “Means Test” and Why Does it Matter in Bankruptcy?

The “Means Test” was one of the major and most controversial additions to consumer bankruptcy law that occurred as part of the 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”). Part of the congressional intent of BAPCPA was to limit a person’s ability to obtain Chapter 7 relief and instead direct them into filing Chapter 13. While there are many reasons why some consumer debtors actually prefer to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy, Chapter 7 is still widely available and common, only now with a few additional hurdles to pass.

These “hurdles” to qualify to Chapter 7 that were added in 2005 as part of BAPCPA are collectively referred to as the “Means Test”. In actuality, the Means Test is an 8-page calculation that determines one’s eligibility for Chapter 7 using criteria such as the debtor’s income (as based on the last six months), household size, expenses and any special circumstances that may justify relief under Chapter 7 bankruptcy. While many of the numbers used are drawn from IRS standard allowances for food, utilities, and similar routine expenses, a person’s actual payments made monthly on secured debts such as mortgages and car loans are included to reduce their income. Generally speaking, if a person has no disposable income remaining at the end of the month after payment of all these standard and actual expenses, they may qualify for Chapter 7.

However, if when the last six months of income is annualized (i.e., doubled) and the person falls above the median income for their household size and state, they are instead steered toward filing Chapter 13, which includes a monthly repayment plan. As of 11/01/2015, the median income in Minnesota for a household of one person is $51,199, for two people $68,515, for three people $80,804, and $98,447 for four people. The median income adjusts at least once per year and these amounts reflect the median income as last adjusted on November 1, 2015 which will again be adjusted in April of 2016.

Even if someone is above the median income for Minnesota, they may still qualify for Chapter 7 (also referred to as “passing the Means Test”) based on other circumstances.

One job of your bankruptcy attorney is to give you all your bankruptcy and non-bankruptcy options, including calculating the Means Test for you and advising you on whether you qualify for Chapter 7 or if you may want or need to file Chapter 13 instead.

Wartchow Law Office is a law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law, representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

When Will I Owe a “Deficiency” after Foreclosure in Minnesota? It Depends.

Under some circumstances after foreclosure, a deficiency may still be owed on a foreclosed property. A deficiency or “deficiency judgment” is obtained by some lenders (a.k.a. “mortgagees”) after a foreclosure on real estate where the sales price of the property does not cover the balance due on the mortgage plus related any fees and costs. The amount of the deficiency is usually the difference between the total amount due on the note including expenses and costs and the amount received from the foreclosure sale (or the fair market value of the mortgaged property if the property is agricultural).

Typically under the Minnesota Anti-Deficiency Statute (Minn. Stat. 582.30), a homeowner is protected from owing a deficiency on the first mortgage on foreclosed homestead real estate. This protection only applies to certain, although common, circumstances where the property is the owner’s home and the foreclosure process was conducted as a foreclosure by advertisement. If the property is not homestead, or otherwise if the owner moves out of the property or the property is foreclosed by action, Minnesota’s statutory protection against a deficiency may not apply.

Indications that no deficiency may be owed on a foreclosed home:

  • Property is classified as a homestead property
  • The home’s value is more than what was owed on the mortgage (i.e., the home had equity)
  • Foreclosure was conducted as a “foreclosure by advertisement”
  • Mortgage in question was the first mortgage
  • Home was not abandoned before the foreclosure process was complete
  • A discharge was received in prior bankruptcy and no refinance or reaffirmation of the mortgage has occurred since

Indications that a deficiency may be owed on a foreclosed home:

  • The property was non-homestead property, i.e. rental, agricultural or commercial property
  • The amount due on the mortgage exceeds the value or sales price of the property (i.e., no equity exists in the property)
  • Mortgage in question was the second or third mortgage (i.e., any mortgage other than first priority lien)
  • Foreclosure was conducted as a “foreclosure by action”
  • Instead of foreclosure, the property was short sold, surrendered or transferred back to the lender by a deed in lieu

A discharge in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 (or Chapter 11) bankruptcy relieves a debtor from owing a deficiency on a foreclosed mortgage in most instances. In order to understand your rights and the potential liability for deficiency that you may face, you should contact an attorney to review the real estate property and foreclosure process applicable to you.

Lynn Wartchow is the founding attorney of Wartchow Law Office located in Edina, MN and represents individual consumer and business bankruptcy clients in the Minneapolis / St. Paul and greater Twin Cities metro area in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings filed in the Bankruptcy Court for the District of Minnesota. Wartchow Law Office also represents consumer debtors in bankruptcy proceedings filed in the Western District of Wisconsin.

Received a Form 1099-C on Foreclosed Home? You May Qualify for the Mortgage Forgiveness Exclusion to Cancellation of Debt Income.

If you receive a Form 1099-C reporting ‘debt cancellation’ income after a home foreclosure, you may qualify for the Mortgage Forgiveness exclusion. As if the distress of home foreclosure isn’t enough, homeowners may receive a Form 1099-C from their former mortgage lender reporting the deficiency owed as income to the homeowner. The income reported on the Form 1099-C is what’s referred to as “Cancellation of Debt Income” or “Discharge of Indebtedness Income”, both of which generally must be reported as taxable income on an individual’s Form 1040 federal and state tax returns. When the 1099 relates to foreclosed real estate, the amount of cancelled debt can be significant and can consequently result in a substantial increase in tax liability for that year, loss of tax refunds or even additional tax liabilities owed to the IRS and Minnesota Department of Revenue.

For a more detailed discussion on tax debt and other tax resolution issues, be sure to read Wartchow Law’s Tax Blog.

Typically, cancellation of debt is an income realization event that must be reported on one’s tax returns. The idea is that any amount of principal or interest that a person legally owes but does not have to repay is considered taxable income in the year that such debt is cancelled. As an illustration, if you owe a commercial lender $15,000 between interest and principal due on a loan but that creditor agrees to accept $5,000 and cancel the other $10,000 in satisfaction of the full amount, that creditor is required by federal law to issue an IRS Form 1099-C, which reports the $10,000 cancelled debt as taxable income to you. Depending on the circumstances, the amount reported on Form 1099 must be included as personal income unless a statutory exclusion applies. Most of the IRS’s income exclusions are conditioned upon insolvency of the taxpayer—i.e., total debts exceed total fair market value of all assets—however bankruptcy is not necessarily required to qualify under certain IRS insolvency exclusions. Even in the absence of insolvency, a homeowner may still qualify for the Mortgage Forgiveness exclusion.

The Mortgage Forgiveness exclusion is provided under the Mortgage Debt Relief Act of 2007, which allows most taxpayers to exclude 1099 income resulting from the discharge of debt on their principal residence. The key to qualifying for this exclusion is that the debt must have been incurred to buy, build or substantially improve your principal residence and the debt must have been secured by your principal residence. Most traditional mortgages on homestead properties would meet this criteria. Currently, the Mortgage Debt Relief Act only applies through 2012, after which it may be extended by additional act of Congress.

When an individual files for bankruptcy, Section 108 of the Internal Revenue Code automatically excludes any debt that was discharged in the bankruptcy from taxable income. This is why consumer debtors who receive a discharge in a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding rarely receive a 1099 regarding any of the discharged debts (and if you do, you should talk to your tax preparer about your options to dispute the 1099).

Wartchow Law Office is a law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with  an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law,  representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

For more information on The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act and Debt Cancellation, see IRS Publication 4681 and IRS Form 982 available on the IRS website at www.irs.gov. You should always ask your tax professional for tax advice and not rely on information found online. This information is intended for entertainment purposes only and use of any information from this site or any other web site referred to is for general information only and does not represent personal tax advice either express or implied. You are encouraged to seek professional tax advice for personal income tax questions and assistance.