Congress Extends the Income Exclusion for 1099 ‘Forgiven’ Mortgage Debt to Tax Years 2015 and 2016

For a more detailed discussion on tax debt and other tax resolution issues, be sure to read Wartchow Law’s Tax Blog.

On December 18, 2015, Congress extended certain tax breaks to apply for both tax years 2015 and 2016, including the income exclusion for forgiven mortgage debt on a qualified principal residence. “Forgiven” or “cancelled” mortgage debt on a Form 1099-C occurs usually after a homestead is foreclosed, short sold or otherwise a defaulted mortgage goes unpaid for the statutory period of time. Upon the occurrence of these events, banks are required to treat the unpaid balance as “forgiven” and issue a Form 1099-C to the homeowner for the balance that is cancelled. (The term “forgiven” is a gross misnomer since, in fact, the mortgage balance remains lawfully collectible in full—more on that later in this article).

As of October 20, 2015, the Mortgage Debt Relief Act had not yet been extended to tax year 2015. However since President Obama approved an extension of the tax relief for the next two tax years (i.e., 2015 and 2016), this means that homeowners receiving a 1099 for mortgage debt will not be required to declare mortgage debt as taxable income on their federal income tax return. In past years, Congress has typically waited until December to extend the Act’s tax relief to homeowners (better last minute than never).

The Internal Revenue Service and state taxing authorities treat the 1099’d mortgage debt as taxable income unless an exclusion is claimed by the taxpayer on Form 982 for the tax year for which the 1099 is issued. This means that a 1099 received on even a mortgage balance of $30,000, for example, can result in significant federal and state income tax liability upwards of $5,000 or more for just a middle-income taxpayer. For higher income earners, this 1099 could result in massive tax consequences into the tens of thousands. The exclusion operates to exclude the 1099 from taxable income if the amount forgiven was “qualified principal residence indebtedness”. For current information on this and other income exclusions, see IRS Publication 4681.

This income tax exclusion for forgiven mortgage debt dates back to 2007 and Congress’s then-response to overwhelming consumer need for protection against tax liability contained in the Mortgage Foreclosure Debt Forgiveness Act. This most recent bill passing by Congress now allows for homeowners to claim the income exclusion on their 2015 and 2016 tax returns (assuming the 1099-C is issued for 2015 or 2016).

Tax year 2017 is currently without any extension of the mortgage debt income exclusion–look for that decision to be before Congress in December 2017. Other income exclusions may still be available however, for example the insolvency exclusion or the exclusion for a discharge received in bankruptcy.

This income tax “relief” for forgiven mortgage debt is not to be taken without a heaping measure of caution, however.

First, a 1099 does not actually denote that the mortgage balance forgiven and, in fact, the homeowner still owes the entire amount to the bank which can be collected upon via lawsuit and other means. Wait, back that up. The bank declares the mortgage forgiven and takes their tax benefit, the homeowner is personally responsible for the resulting income tax on the forgiven amount, but yet the homeowner can STILL be held accountable for the mortgage balance owed? Yes, actually. Practically, this means that the bank may still lawfully report the entire balance as due, owing and in default on a homeowner’s credit report, potentially ruining their credit. More significantly, perhaps, this also means that a homeowner can be sued for the forgiven balance and, if judgment is obtained, their wages garnished and bank account levied.

There are many state courts around the country—including here in Minnesota—that have declared that issuance of a Form 1099-C does not alone operate to legally extinguish a debt and, therefore, the full balance remains outstanding absent some operation of the law, such as a discharge received in a bankruptcy proceeding. These courts rely on an IRS Information Letter dated December 30, 2005, which explained: “The Internal Revenue Service does not view a Form 1099-C as an admission by the creditor that it has discharged the debt and can no longer pursue collection.” See I.R.S. Info. 2005-0207, 2005 WL 3561135 (Dec. 30, 2005). How’s that for deceptive wording?

Second, the timing of asserting the exclusion on your income tax return is tight to say the least. Assuming a homeowner timely receives the 1099-C following the end of the tax year for which it is issued, they still have time to report the income and claim the exclusion via IRS Form 982. But for homeowners who did not timely receive the 1099-C from the bank, the deadline to amend their tax return to claim the exclusion is six months from the date the return was originally due, which is usually April 15th of the following year. As an illustration, if a homeowner was in an active bankruptcy proceeding when the bank declared the mortgage forgiven on a home foreclosed prior to filing bankruptcy, the bank may have issued a 1099-C to the IRS yet simply never sent the 1099-C to the homeowner due to their being in bankruptcy at the time (or instead of bankruptcy, perhaps the 1099 was lost in the mail or the bank sent it to the wrong address). In this example, the homeowner may not find out about the 1099-C until years later when the IRS sends a collection letter for the additional income tax due on the forgiven mortgage—and all in spite of the bankruptcy. The result is that the homeowner is outside of the 6-month deadline for amending their 2013 tax returns to claim the income exclusion and is now strapped with the additional tax debt and a battle against both the bank and the Internal Revenue Service. Try unwinding that tax debacle.

For more about 1099s and the insolvency exclusion, see Received a Form 1099-C on Foreclosed Home? You May Qualify for the Mortgage Forgiveness Exclusion to Cancellation of Debt Income.

More on Divorce and Bankruptcy: How do Child Support, Spousal Support (Alimony / Maintenance) and Property Settlements Impact either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

How certain payments owed under a divorce or family law decree—including child support, spousal support (also called maintenance or alimony) and even property settlements or cash equalizers— may impact your bankruptcy filing depends on whether you are the recipient such payments or the obligator of such payments, i.e., the payer.

For a recipient of child support, spousal support or other domestic support obligations (also called “DSO”), this support income must be added to all other sources of income in order to determine whether one is eligible to file chapter 7 under the means test. Generally speaking, if one’s total annual income from all sources including domestic support income is less than the median income for your state and household size, you will qualify for chapter 7. However if you are above the median income, you are instead steered toward filing chapter 13 with some exceptions. Median income varies by state and household size and is regularly updated. Especially if you are ‘on the line’ of the median income or above it, it is the initial job of any bankruptcy attorney to calculate the means test and advise on eligibility for chapter 7 under current median income standards.

For the payer of domestic support obligations, such support payments are typically allowed as an expense on the means test which effectively reduces one’s annual income. This means that if your regular wage or self-employment income is above the median income for your state and household size but the subtraction of domestic support payments brings you back down below the median income, then you would qualify for chapter 7 bankruptcy. Qualification for chapter 7 via this route is also called “rebutting the presumption of abuse” on the means test. However if one’s income is such that the subtraction of DSO payments does not reduce the income below the median or alternatively if one is not actually making the required DSO payments, then they may not qualify for chapter 7 and instead file chapter 13.

The means test involves various additional factors other than income and domestic support payments. For more information about median income and the means test, see What is the “Means Test” and Why Does it Matter in Bankruptcy? and 2014 Median Income in Minnesota.

Regarding property settlements (also sometimes referred to as equalization payments or cash equalizers), these are usually ordered in a divorce based on a fair distribution of marital assets rather than a need for financial support by one spouse. For example, a wife may be ordered to pay a property settlement to her ex to “equalize” her award of a family home having equity that was built up during the marriage. In this case, the wife that keeps the family home may be required to pay her ex-spouse one half of the home equity by a certain future date. Property settlements also commonly arise when one spouse is assuming most or all of joint debts acquired during the marriage and the other spouse emerges from divorce debt free other than the obligation to pay the property settlement. In any event, unpaid property settlements and cash equalizations are valuable assets that must be listed in the bankruptcy case of the recipient.

As with all assets, any individual bankruptcy debtor is limited as to the total value of assets which may be exempt and it’s possible that a portion of a large unpaid property settlement (above approx. $12,000) could be non-exempt if the recipient files bankruptcy. In this case, the non-exempt portion of the property settlement would become property of the bankruptcy estate and either liquidated in chapter 7 or, in chapter 13, at least the equivalent of the non-exempt portion must be paid into the plan. This situation is also circumstance dependent and may be affected by the facts of one’s situation, including whether the obligator spouse has a practical ability to pay the settlement.

For the payer of the property settlement, this award is a liability that must be listed in the creditor schedules. Unlike most debts, one’s liability to pay a property settlement is not usually discharged in chapter 7 bankruptcy however may be discharged under some circumstances in chapter 13 bankruptcy.

A qualified bankruptcy attorney will explain more how a property settlement would be treated under your specific circumstances, the chapter of bankruptcy you file and local bankruptcy law. For more information on how property settlements are treated in chapter 13, see Bankruptcy and Divorce: Some Payments in a Divorce Decree May be Dischargeable in Chapter 13.

Also read more about family law and timing considerations in bankruptcy: Bankruptcy and Divorce: What Should Come First?

Located in Edina, Minnesota, attorney Lynn Wartchow represents clients in all chapters of bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota. Contact for a free consultation.

Bankruptcy Options if You Are Behind on Condo / Townhome Assessments

Behind on your monthly HOAs, late fees or special assessments owed to your homeowner’s association?

Under Minnesota statute, most defaulted amounts due to a homeowner’s association create an automatic lien against the individual unit, which means that these amounts remain secured against the condo or townhome even after bankruptcy. Because of this statutory lien, the association can collect against a defaulting owner either by way of initiating a lawsuit for personal liability or, less frequently, by foreclosing its lien.

Read more about Condo, Townhome and HOA Association Liens in Minnesota.

While bankruptcy typically discharges one’s personal liability for unpaid assessments as of the date the bankruptcy is filed, the automatic association lien that is created by statute still exists in spite of bankruptcy. Therefore the association retains a right to foreclose the unit either after a bankruptcy discharge is received or during bankruptcy with court approval. Because filing of bankruptcy only offers temporary relief for a defaulting condo or townhome owner who wishes to retain the property, a long term resolution of the association arrears is necessary.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows a defaulting homeowner as long as three to five years to repay their association for any “pre-petition” amounts due. While in chapter 13, the homeowner must stay current on the monthly HOAs and any new special assessments or they again will risk an association foreclosure of the unit for “post-petition” amounts due.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharges personal liability for unpaid association assessments / HOAs but will not resolve the automatic lien if the homeowner intends to keep the property.

There are options in bankruptcy if you are behind on assessments due to the association and these options vary depending on whether you intend to keep the property. If you own a condo or townhome and are considering bankruptcy to stop a foreclosure or lawsuit, it’s important to understand how bankruptcy may impact your liability for association dues, fees and other assessments, your right to continue to use common amenities, and the risks of foreclosure. Especially under these circumstances, it’s best to get advice from a bankruptcy attorney who understands the various forms of bankruptcy relief to protect your interests with regard to the property.

Attorney Lynn Wartchow is a Minneapolis / St. Paul area bankruptcy attorney representing clients in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 consumer bankruptcy proceedings in Minnesota since 2005.Call for a free bankruptcy consultation to understand your options in Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Converting from Chapter 13 to Chapter 7: What’s Involved and Why Would You Convert?

Life inevitably changes and things happen that may cause a chapter 13 debtor to no longer need or afford their original chapter 13 plan. A job loss, other reduction of income or unanticipated increase in expenses can all be reasons for a debtor to lose their ability to continue making the chapter 13 plan payments. If the chapter 13 payments become unfeasible and, assuming the debtor qualifies, a chapter 13 case can be converted to chapter 7 for an immediate discharge.

Typically people file chapter 13 bankruptcy for one of two reasons: Either their household income is above the applicable state median income and they do not qualify for chapter 7, or they voluntarily elect to file chapter 13 due to having mortgage arrears, non-dischargeable taxes or other priority debts that can be repaid over the course of a chapter 13 plan. Also debtors may elect to file chapter 13 if they have non-exempt assets that would lose to liquidation by a chapter 7 trustee and instead chose to ‘buy back’ their non-exempt property by making monthly plan payments in chapter 13.

In cases converted to chapter 7 from chapter 13, the debtor must prove that they would qualify for chapter 7 as of the date of conversion (not the original file date) by passing the means test. See What is the “Means Test” and Why Does it Matter in Bankruptcy. The debtor’s bankruptcy attorney will complete a new means test as of the date of conversion to determine if the debtor is chapter 7 eligible. If eligible, the case can be converted by the debtor filing a motion to convert to chapter 7 which gives all creditors and other parties the opportunity to object. (Note that in Minnesota, no motion is required and the debtor can instead file a simple request to convert to chapter 7 along with updated schedules and statements). If the motion/request to convert is granted, the case will proceed as a chapter 7 case and the debtor will attend a chapter 7 Meeting of Creditors before a discharge is ordered.

If your income has gone down or your expenses have increased since your chapter 13 plan was confirmed, you should consult your bankruptcy attorney so she can advise you of what options you have to convert to chapter 7, to have your case dismissed voluntarily or otherwise to modify your chapter 13 plan to reduce the plan payment. Any missed chapter 13 plan payments will result in a quick dismissal of your chapter 13 case so it is important to notify your attorney immediately if you are considering a conversion to chapter 7 from chapter 13. Once a chapter 13 case is dismissed, the debtor will have to pay a significantly larger filing fee to file chapter 7 and also increased attorney fees over the typically smaller attorney fee for just a conversion.

Read more about converting from chapter 7 to chapter 13 bankruptcy here.

How the 2014 Changes to Regulation Z (TILA) and Regulation X (RESPA) Impact Homeowners who are in Default on their Mortgage or in Bankruptcy

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is the federal agency that oversees and sets the standards and regulations for how home mortgages are serviced by lenders, particularly in the wake the post-2010 mortgage crisis. Amongst its many duties, the CFPB is tasked with creating and enforcing regulations on how home mortgages are serviced in the United States and, more specifically, how homeowners that are in default or in an active bankruptcy proceeding. In January 2014, the CFPB made some notable changes to Regulation Z (TILA) and Regulation X (RESPA) in an effort to provide homeowners with greater consumer protections regarding their mortgages.

For more information about foreclosure in Minnesota and options in bankruptcy, read Foreclosure in Minnesota: Know the Process, Timeline and How Bankruptcy Can Help.

As of January 10, 2014, the CFPB instituted new mandatory requirements regarding mortgages, including the following changes that apply to homeowners in bankruptcy proceedings:

  • “Dual tracking” of foreclosure actions now prohibited while a mortgage modification application is pending. Most important for many homeowners is that the recent 2014 changes now prohibit foreclosure while the homeowner has a mortgage modification application pending a response from their bank. “Dual tracking” is the practice of many banks to continue foreclosure proceedings while at the same time consider a mortgage modification application submitted by the homeowner. Understandably, this dual tracking caused enormous frustration for homeowners already struggling through the tedious and often prolonged process of obtaining a mortgage modification before the clock ticked down on a simultaneous foreclosure proceeding. Instead, mortgage servicers are now prohibited from initiating foreclosure proceedings during the first 120 days of delinquency and also must stop a foreclosure proceeding if the homeowner has submitted a “complete” application for loss mitigation.
  • Monthly mortgage statements must be provided despite the homeowner’s default or bankruptcy. Previously, many homeowners in default on their home mortgage or in an active bankruptcy proceeding experienced that their lender ceased sending the periodic mortgage statements that are relied on to track mortgage account information and make the monthly mortgage payments. With the 2014 changes, the mortgagee bank must now provide a homeowner who is 45 days or more delinquent with a detailed statement that includes, amongst other items: the date of first delinquency and a six-month account history that tracks the accrued delinquency over time, notification of risks such as foreclosure as well as loss mitigation options including mortgage modification and contact information for HUD-approved home counselors and the total amount due to bring the account current. These new rules do not apply to some fixed rate mortgages, reverse mortgages or timeshares.
  • Notice of all mortgage payment changes must be filed with the Bankruptcy Court and provided to Chapter 13 debtors. Previously, homeowners in bankruptcy cases were not always notified when their adjustable rate mortgage adjusted interest rate and, accordingly, their monthly payment also adjusted. With the 2014 changes, homeowners in Chapter 13 will receive notice from the mortgagee bank of the upcoming mortgage payment change since the bank must now file a statement with the bankruptcy court each time that the mortgage payment changes due to an adjustment in interest rate or other change in terms.
  • Force placed insurance now restricted. Previous to the 2014 changes by the CFPB, some mortgagee banks required that homeowners compensate the bank for mandatory hazard insurance that the bank obtains instead of the homeowner providing their own homeowner’s insurance. Once the bank obtained a separate insurance policy on the home, the bank would then force the homeowner to compensate the bank either by a mandatory and additional escrow into their mortgage payment and/or a charge-back to the homeowner for the bank-paid insurance. This force placed insurance often resulted in higher premiums to the homeowner, additional bank fees and increased the total arrearage owed to bring the mortgage current. The January 2014 changes now mandate that the mortgagee bank must now provide at least two notices to the homeowner requesting proof of insurance before the bank can institute the often more costly force placed insurance. Additionally when it is allowed after the requisite notice, the bank’s costs and fees associated with force placed insurance are also now restricted.
  • Banks must respond to homeowner request for account information and error reporting within 60 days. The 2014 changes to Regulations Z and X now require that mortgagee banks respond to homeowner requests for account information and alleged account errors within 60 days. Additionally, mortgagee banks must provide confirmation to the homeowner of their request within 5 days and must initiate an investigation within 30 days.

Links to more information on CFPB and consumer protection in mortgage servicing laws:

For more information on the foreclosure process in Minnesota and how Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy may help, contact Wartchow Law Office for a free bankruptcy consultation to understand your options.

Condo, Townhome and HOA Association Liens in Minnesota

In Minnesota, if you have unpaid condominium or townhome association assessments—which are often called “HOAs”—these unpaid amounts operate automatically as a lien on the property under Minnesota Statute § 515B.3-116(a), which is part of the Minnesota Common Interest Ownership Act.

What a condo or townhome association lien typically means for the homeowner is that you cannot get out of paying past due HOA assessments while you own the property. Further, it means that the property can be foreclosed by the Association for unpaid homeowner’s association assessments even if you are current on your mortgages. Due to the financial risk of having unpaid HOAs, the Association’s Board of Directors will often opt to foreclose for lesser amounts and on quicker timelines than a mortgagee would typically foreclose an unpaid mortgage.

For the Association, the protection of an automatic Minnesota statutory lien on the property provides a high level of protection for the Association from accruing large amounts of unpaid HOA assessments for which the other members of the Association may have to make up via a special assessment. Unpaid HOA assessments can be collected upon against a unit owner via a lawsuit against the homeowner and very likely at the expense of the homeowner when the Association’s attorney fees are added to the statutory lien amount. Under the Minnesota Common Interest Ownership statute and likely under the Association’s declaration and bylaws, the automatic lien also includes other amounts and charges associate with collection efforts.

Additional to these legal remedies, many Minnesota homeowner’s declarations and bylaws include the provision that the Association may suspend the rights of any owner or occupant including their guests to use the common element amenities. This means that not only will that homeowner be denied their voting rights, but also that a homeowner’s right to use common amenities such as laundry, parking and other services may be suspended for the non-payment of HOA assessments and other charges due to the Association. Minnesota law does not usually allow for the Association to suspend utility services and physical access to the unit.

The best bet is to stay current on your Association dues and avoid any accrual of assessments, late charges and other fees. Bankruptcy may help you by discharging some amounts due to the Association, but the availability of bankruptcy relief for condo or townhome liens is often dependent on the individual circumstances and whether the owner intends to keep the property.

Located in Edina, Lynn Wartchow represents homeowners in all Chapters of bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota.

Converting from Chapter 7 to Chapter 13: What’s Involved and Why Would You Convert?

Conversion to Chapter 13 from Chapter 7 isn’t a death sentence for your bankruptcy case (see Chapter 13: Not Always a Gloomy Diagnosis in Bankruptcy). Perhaps a Chapter 7 was filed underestimating your income and you didn’t actually qualify for Chapter 7 for this reason. Or perhaps you realize after filing your Chapter 7 that you have mortgage arrears that you wish to repay in order to save your home from foreclosure, which is something that you cannot do in Chapter 7. Or perhaps you discover after already filing Chapter 7 that you have non-exempt assets which you would rather ‘pay to keep’ in Chapter 13 rather than turn over to the Chapter 7 trustee for immediate liquidation. Also, conversion can arise when the Office of the United States Trustee brings a motion to dismiss your Chapter 7 case for abuse, usually citing that you did not qualify for Chapter 7 from the beginning. While converting to Chapter 13 is neither an everyday experience nor a great risk for the average debtor, it can arise and ideally your attorney has already explained the differences between Chapter 13 and Chapter 7.

What can you expect if you convert to Chapter 7 from Chapter 13:

  • File and sign new petition forms and amended schedules required for the verified conversion.
  • Formulate a Chapter 13 plan with your attorney. The plan will propose a monthly Chapter 13 payment to commence about one month after the conversion is filed and continue for three to five years. From this payment, mortgage arrears and priority tax claims can be paid off over three to five years, vehicle loans may be crammed down to the value of the vehicle rather than the pre-petition balance of the loan, and other terms can be written into your plan that are more versatile than can be achieved in Chapter 7.
  • Attendance at the Chapter 13 Meeting of Creditors. You will need to attend a Meeting of Creditors with the Chapter 13 trustee even if you have already attended a Chapter 7 Meeting of Creditors.
  • Additional attorney fees. Chapter 13 almost always costs more than Chapter 7, in large part due to the attorney work necessary to formulate a Chapter 13 plan and for the fact that your bankruptcy attorney continues to represent you throughout the entire three to five-year Chapter 13 plan (versus the few months in which a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is usually completed). Many times, these fees can be paid in large part ‘through the plan’, which means the attorney fees are paid over time through the monthly plan payments you make to the Chapter 13 trustee.

Unless you recognize a change in circumstances where you voluntarily wish to convert your case, your attorney will also apprise you of any event arising in your Chapter 7 case which may require conversion to Chapter 13.

For more information on how to convert your case from Chapter 7 to Chapter 13, contact Wartchow Law Office for a free bankruptcy consultation. Located in Edina, Minnesota, Wartchow Law represents clients in all forms of bankruptcy throughout the Minneapolis and St. Paul metro area of Minnesota.

What Happens after the 341 Meeting of Creditors is Over?

The answer to this depends on whether you have filed Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. (Chapter 11 individual debtors also are required to attend a Meeting of Creditors). At a minimum and for all Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases, the debtor must take the second financial management course and file the certificate with the Bankruptcy Court. The Notice of the Meeting of Creditors will give a specific deadline for filing the certificate in a chapter 7 case (the certificate can be filed anytime up to the week prior to the discharge being received) while in chapter 13 the certificate may be filed at any time before their chapter 13 Plan is complete.

In most Chapter 7 cases, attendance at the Meeting of Creditors which occurs about one month after your case is filed, is the last active event for a debtor in a bankruptcy proceeding. Once the Chapter 7 trustee has concluded the Meeting of Creditors and determined that no additional questions or documents will be needed from the debtor, the debtor only has to complete the second financial management course and wait for their Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge to be entered by the Bankruptcy Court about two months later. A Chapter 7 case is held usually open for two months after the date of the Meeting of Creditors so that certain actions can be taken in a case. Although these post-Meeting of Creditors actions are somewhat uncommon in the garden-variety Chapter 7 case, potential actions include turnover of a non-exempt asset to the Chapter 7 trustee, a creditor objection to the discharge of a particular debt (which is a common type of adversary proceeding), motions to dismiss a case brought by the attorney for the Office of the United States Trustee, or an administrative audit of the Chapter 7 case. Your Chapter 7 attorney can advise you of the potential actions and other requirements you may expect to occur after the Meeting of Creditors in your bankruptcy case, if anything. However most of the time once the Meeting of Creditors is over, it’s just a matter of waiting for your discharge without any further action required other than completing the financial management course.

In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the Chapter 13 plan is often confirmed about one month after the Meeting of Creditors is concluded. While plan confirmation requires an additional court hearing, attendance is rarely required at the confirmation hearing and you should not plan to attend unless your attorney advises you to do so. Once confirmed, the Chapter 13 debtor must continue to make all Chapter 13 plan payments as well as any other requirements set forth under the terms of their confirmed Chapter 13 plan (such as to report any bonus income received during the plan to the Chapter 13 trustee or provide income tax returns each year). Since a Chapter 13 case will remain an active bankruptcy case while the plan is underway, there are a number of events that can arise after the Meeting of Creditors that require you’re your and your attorney’s involvement. For example if during the course of the Chapter 13 plan there are significant changes to income or expenses, your bankruptcy attorney may advise you to file a motion to convert to Chapter 7 rather than stay in Chapter 13. Also, if you move or change your address you must notify your attorney.

Located in Edina, Minnesota, Lynn Wartchow represents clients in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota.

How Are Non-Dischargeable Debts Treated in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Non-dischargeable debts are those few categories of personal liabilities which can never be discharged in either form of Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Non-dischargeable debts include most individual income taxes, many business-related taxes such as withholding tax and other trust fund taxes, domestic support obligations, spousal support/alimony and child support, debts related to fraud or fiduciary embezzlement, educational and student loans, unlisted debts and other less common types of debts. (Note that some divorce decree obligations may be dischargeable in Chapter 13.)

One of the great benefits of Chapter 13 over Chapter 7 is that certain non-dischargeable debts can be paid back over time in Chapter 13 plan, usually over five years, which can maximize a Chapter 13 debtor’s cash flow and repayment flexibility. For example in Chapter 13, you can stretch out repayment of priority debts—such as income taxes—over five years versus the standard two to three years the taxing authorities typically require outside of bankruptcy.

It’s important to note that most taxes, domestic support obligations and mortgage arrearages must be repaid in full through the Chapter 13 plan. Practically speaking, this means that the debtor’s budget must demonstrate that they afford the minimum monthly repayment required in order to repay the non-dischargeable over sixty months (in a five year plan).  Your Chapter 13 attorney can help you calculate whether repayment of the non-dischargeable debts is feasible considering your monthly income and expenses.

The flexibility of time in repaying the few categories of non-dischargeable debts is a distinct advantage to Chapter 13. Whether a debt is discharged in bankruptcy is often fact-specific and you should seek the advice of an attorney for more information specific to your circumstances.

Wartchow Law Office advises clients in Minnesota on how Chapter 13 bankruptcy can provide relief and what they can expect from a Chapter 13 plan.  Contact for a free consultation and more information on options available under Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Located in Edina, Minnesota.

 

 

Will My Assets Be Protected in Bankruptcy? What Are the Bankruptcy Exemptions?

Most people who file for bankruptcy are able to protect most if not all of their assets, including cash bank accounts, household goods and furnishings, 401(k) plans and IRAs (as well as other types of retirement accounts), cars and vehicles, their homestead and more. Assets are protected in a bankruptcy by way of exemptions, meaning that an asset is protected when it is ‘exempt from the bankruptcy estate’.  When an asset is exempt, it is outside of the reach of both creditors and the bankruptcy trustee and will not be liquidated to cash to be applied to debts. When an asset is non-exempt, it must be surrendered to the Chapter 7 trustee or otherwise the value liquidated and paid into a Chapter 13 plan.

In both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy, all assets must be fully disclosed on the bankruptcy Schedules A and B. Assets include any interest in real property as well as all conceivable forms of personal property, bank accounts, and even certain intangible property such as rights to sue and future interests. Exemptions are listed on the bankruptcy Schedule C which restates the property claimed exempt, its value and the amount claimed exempt, and the basis for the exemption under either federal exemptions or Minnesota state exemptions. Both the federal and Minnesota bankruptcy exemptions provide for various categories of commonly exempt property, such as the debtor’s future earnings and income, a homestead interest, vehicles and cars, jewelry, tools of trade used in a debtor’s profession, household possessions and personal effects, retirement accounts, social security benefits, tax refunds, insurance proceeds, and many more. Most exemption categories specify a defined dollar limit for each type of asset exempted and the exemption limits are updated regularly.

While most people’s assets are protected within the available bankruptcy exemptions, common sense dictates that there are reasonable limits to what can be protected when one files for bankruptcy. For example, it may be difficult for a debtor to receive a discharge in Chapter 7 bankruptcy while retaining significant equity a family cabin or rental property. Whether your assets can be protected in bankruptcy is fact dependent and a comprehensive disclosure of assets is an important discussion to have with your bankruptcy attorney before you file bankruptcy. And this is a discussion that should be open and honest since full disclosure of assets is required on the bankruptcy schedules. Additionally, some asset exemption planning steps may be taken before a bankruptcy is filed to maximize your ability to protect certain assets.

Wartchow Law Office provides free initial consultations to discuss your assets and what exemptions may be available to you in either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Located in Edina, MN, Lynn Wartchow represents clients in Minneapolis and throughout Minnesota.