What Happens after the 341 Meeting of Creditors is Over?

The answer to this depends on whether you have filed Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. (Chapter 11 individual debtors also are required to attend a Meeting of Creditors). At a minimum and for all Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases, the debtor must take the second financial management course and file the certificate with the Bankruptcy Court. The Notice of the Meeting of Creditors will give a specific deadline for filing the certificate in a chapter 7 case (the certificate can be filed anytime up to the week prior to the discharge being received) while in chapter 13 the certificate may be filed at any time before their chapter 13 Plan is complete.

In most Chapter 7 cases, attendance at the Meeting of Creditors which occurs about one month after your case is filed, is the last active event for a debtor in a bankruptcy proceeding. Once the Chapter 7 trustee has concluded the Meeting of Creditors and determined that no additional questions or documents will be needed from the debtor, the debtor only has to complete the second financial management course and wait for their Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge to be entered by the Bankruptcy Court about two months later. A Chapter 7 case is held usually open for two months after the date of the Meeting of Creditors so that certain actions can be taken in a case. Although these post-Meeting of Creditors actions are somewhat uncommon in the garden-variety Chapter 7 case, potential actions include turnover of a non-exempt asset to the Chapter 7 trustee, a creditor objection to the discharge of a particular debt (which is a common type of adversary proceeding), motions to dismiss a case brought by the attorney for the Office of the United States Trustee, or an administrative audit of the Chapter 7 case. Your Chapter 7 attorney can advise you of the potential actions and other requirements you may expect to occur after the Meeting of Creditors in your bankruptcy case, if anything. However most of the time once the Meeting of Creditors is over, it’s just a matter of waiting for your discharge without any further action required other than completing the financial management course.

In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the Chapter 13 plan is often confirmed about one month after the Meeting of Creditors is concluded. While plan confirmation requires an additional court hearing, attendance is rarely required at the confirmation hearing and you should not plan to attend unless your attorney advises you to do so. Once confirmed, the Chapter 13 debtor must continue to make all Chapter 13 plan payments as well as any other requirements set forth under the terms of their confirmed Chapter 13 plan (such as to report any bonus income received during the plan to the Chapter 13 trustee or provide income tax returns each year). Since a Chapter 13 case will remain an active bankruptcy case while the plan is underway, there are a number of events that can arise after the Meeting of Creditors that require you’re your and your attorney’s involvement. For example if during the course of the Chapter 13 plan there are significant changes to income or expenses, your bankruptcy attorney may advise you to file a motion to convert to Chapter 7 rather than stay in Chapter 13. Also, if you move or change your address you must notify your attorney.

Located in Edina, Minnesota, Lynn Wartchow represents clients in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin County, and throughout Minnesota.