What are the Debt Limits for Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Click here to see the current Chapter 13 Debt Limits effective April 1, 2016 and valid through 2019.

As of the date of this post, the debt limits for Chapter 13 bankruptcy are $1,081,400 in secured debt plus $360,475 in unsecured debt (see the 2014 debt limits here). These limits include only debts that are not disputed, non-contingent and liquidated. This means that amounts which are not yet decided (for example, a potential award of attorney fees in a pending lawsuit) may not count toward these limits. Taxes (whether dischargeable tax or non-dischargeable tax) are included in the unsecured debt limit calculation and disputing a debt without cause generally does not remove it from either calculation.

These statutory debt limits for Chapter 13 are adjusted every three years and the next adjustment is scheduled to occur in 2013. Note: The 2014 Chapter 13 debt limits have been updated as of April 1, 2013.

If you exceed these Chapter 13 debt limits, you can still file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy assuming that all other eligibility criteria for Chapter 7 are met under the “means test”. However, if you are above the debt limits for Chapter 13 and also above the income qualification for Chapter 7, you may still file an individual Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding, which is a more involved and expensive bankruptcy proceeding than Chapter 13 however an individual Chapter 11 has unique opportunities to reorganize certain debts with more favorable terms.

Lynn Wartchow is a bankruptcy attorney located in Edina, Minnesota and representing clients in both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 consumer bankruptcy proceedings throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul in Minnesota. Contact for a free consultation and more information on options available under Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

What Should I Expect at the 341 Bankruptcy Meeting of Creditors?

If you have done basic research into the bankruptcy process, you will know that about one month after filing a bankruptcy petition and schedules there will be a mandatory hearing called the “341 Meeting of Creditors”, which is named after the section of the Bankruptcy Code that requires the hearing.

Clients often ask what to expect at the Meeting of Creditors, what they should bring to the Meeting of Creditors and what creditors will be present at the Meeting of Creditors.

For most people, the Meeting of Creditors is relatively uneventful: it’s typically held at the federal courthouse in a hearing room with people who filed bankruptcy around the same date that you did and their attorneys, all waiting for their names to be called so they can sit for the few minutes of questioning by the bankruptcy trustee assigned to their case. When your name is called, you can expect to go up and sit at the hearing table across from the trustee, and then be sworn in under oath to tell the truth, to confirm your name and address and then to answer some basic yes/no questioning for several minutes. If you have fully disclosed everything to your attorney and on your bankruptcy schedules, there should be no surprises and nothing new that comes up during the Meeting of Creditors. In the vast majority of cases, the trustee’s job is routine and they blandly conduct this hearing to determine if there are any non-exempt assets and to get your required testimony on record.

What should I bring to the Meeting of Creditors? In Minnesota bankruptcy cases, you should plan to bring your driver’s license and social security card, all paystubs received since the date that your case was filed, and also a bank statement that confirms the balance in each bank account on the file date of your bankruptcy case. If the trustee wants more documentation, they will either request it at the Meeting of Creditors or from your attorney.

Who shows up at the Meeting of Creditors? Usually, just you, your attorney and the bankruptcy trustee are present for a Meeting of Creditors. It is rare that any creditor will appear for a Meeting of Creditors, even though all creditors will receive notice of the scheduled time and date at least 21 days prior to the hearing. However, the only creditors who typically show up are ex-spouses or ex-business partners that feel jilted by the bankruptcy or, in some rare cases, individuals who have something to reveal to the trustee that was may not have been fully disclosed in the bankruptcy petition and schedules. Rarely does an everyday unsecured creditor make an appearance at the Meeting of Creditors. Even if a creditor or other party-in-interest shows up for the Meeting of Creditors, they are only allowed to ask questions related to the information contained in the schedules and are not allowed to use the Meeting of Creditors as an opportunity to ask unrelated questions.

Many people understandably feel nervous about their upcoming Meeting of Creditors, and inevitably all feel much relief once it is favorably concluded without incident. As long as you have fully disclosed all information in your petition and to your attorney, and you have the required documents and IDs on the hearing date, then the Meeting of Creditors should pose no concern. If you still feel anxious, just ask your attorney to spend a little more time helping you prepare for the Meeting of Creditors and/or provide a list of the sample questions asked at the Meeting of Creditors.

Keep reading for the Typical Questions Asked at the Chapter 7 Meeting of Creditors

Wartchow Law Office is a bankruptcy law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with  an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law,  representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.