What is the “Means Test” and Why Does it Matter in Bankruptcy?

The “Means Test” was one of the major and most controversial additions to consumer bankruptcy law that occurred as part of the 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”). Part of the congressional intent of BAPCPA was to limit a person’s ability to obtain Chapter 7 relief and instead direct them into filing Chapter 13. While there are many reasons why some consumer debtors actually prefer to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy, Chapter 7 is still widely available and common, only now with a few additional hurdles to pass.

These “hurdles” to qualify to Chapter 7 that were added in 2005 as part of BAPCPA are collectively referred to as the “Means Test”. In actuality, the Means Test is an 8-page calculation that determines one’s eligibility for Chapter 7 using criteria such as the debtor’s income (as based on the last six months), household size, expenses and any special circumstances that may justify relief under Chapter 7 bankruptcy. While many of the numbers used are drawn from IRS standard allowances for food, utilities, and similar routine expenses, a person’s actual payments made monthly on secured debts such as mortgages and car loans are included to reduce their income. Generally speaking, if a person has no disposable income remaining at the end of the month after payment of all these standard and actual expenses, they may qualify for Chapter 7.

However, if when the last six months of income is annualized (i.e., doubled) and the person falls above the median income for their household size and state, they are instead steered toward filing Chapter 13, which includes a monthly repayment plan. As of 11/01/2015, the median income in Minnesota for a household of one person is $51,199, for two people $68,515, for three people $80,804, and $98,447 for four people. The median income adjusts at least once per year and these amounts reflect the median income as last adjusted on November 1, 2015 which will again be adjusted in April of 2016.

Even if someone is above the median income for Minnesota, they may still qualify for Chapter 7 (also referred to as “passing the Means Test”) based on other circumstances.

One job of your bankruptcy attorney is to give you all your bankruptcy and non-bankruptcy options, including calculating the Means Test for you and advising you on whether you qualify for Chapter 7 or if you may want or need to file Chapter 13 instead.

Wartchow Law Office is a law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law, representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

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