Foreclosure in Minnesota: Know the Process, Timeline and How Bankruptcy Can Help

Home foreclosures in Minnesota are common and arguably are even on the rise despite an improving real estate market. In April 2012, the Star Tribune reported that while foreclosures were slightly down during the first quarter of 2012, signs still point to an 11 percent increase in Minnesotans facing foreclosure, adding that one in 312 Minnesota homeowners have received some sort of notice of foreclosure.

Home foreclosure in Minnesota happens via one of two legal proceedings: either the lender forecloses by advertisement or the lender forecloses by action. This post only discusses foreclosure by advertisement, which is the more common of the two Minnesota home foreclosure processes.

In a foreclosure by advertisement, the defaulting homeowner will typically receive one or more pre-foreclosure notices that warn of their lender’s intent to start the foreclosure process if payments are not brought current within a specified time. The time between the first default in mortgage payments and a homeowner’s receipt of the pre-foreclosure notice can be one to three months or more, depending on the lender and any efforts the homeowner may be making to do a workout with their lender. After the pre-foreclosure notice has gone out and the homeowner still has not brought their mortgage current, the lender will then serve the homeowner with a notice of sheriff’s sale. While the Minnesota laws governing service of process in a foreclosure proceeding are detailed, most homeowners are served in-person with the foreclosure papers at their home address. The Notice of Sheriff’s Sale, sometimes also called the auction notice, will provide the date, time and location of the upcoming sheriff’s sale, usually to be held six weeks after the date of service and at the county sheriff’s office. Once the sheriff’s sale has come and passed, ownership of the home transfers to the winning bidder (which is usually the lender for the first mortgage on the home) and the homeowner then has his or her redemption period to reside in the home before vacating it permanently. The length of the redemption period varies according to circumstances, but is most often six months from the date of the sheriff’s sale.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy can help a homeowner save their home from foreclosure by providing an avenue to repay the mortgage arrears over three to five years in a Chapter 13 plan. In fact, mortgage arrears is one of the most Common Reasons for Filing Chapter 13 Bankruptcy in Minnesota. If the homeowner can afford to make the monthly Chapter 13 plan payments, their mortgage may be brought current at the end of the Chapter 13 plan, in addition to the discharge of other debts allowed in bankruptcy.

Chapter 7 can stall the foreclosure process for two or more months and, like Chapter 13 bankruptcy, can also serve to discharge any deficiency owed on the second mortgage. While Chapter 7 bankruptcy will not help to resolve any mortgage arrears owed so that the homeowner can save their home, it can buy more time in the house before the homeowner must leave.

Keep reading for more information about How to Postpone a Sheriff’s Sale in Minnesota.

While Minnesota law governs the foreclosure process, the terms of a mortgage also govern a homeowner’s rights and a lender’s ability to foreclose. For more information on the foreclosure process in Minnesota and how Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy may help, contact Wartchow Law Office for a free bankruptcy consultation to understand your options.

What is the “Means Test” and Why Does it Matter in Bankruptcy?

The “Means Test” was one of the major and most controversial additions to consumer bankruptcy law that occurred as part of the 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”). Part of the congressional intent of BAPCPA was to limit a person’s ability to obtain Chapter 7 relief and instead direct them into filing Chapter 13. While there are many reasons why some consumer debtors actually prefer to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy, Chapter 7 is still widely available and common, only now with a few additional hurdles to pass.

These “hurdles” to qualify to Chapter 7 that were added in 2005 as part of BAPCPA are collectively referred to as the “Means Test”. In actuality, the Means Test is an 8-page calculation that determines one’s eligibility for Chapter 7 using criteria such as the debtor’s income (as based on the last six months), household size, expenses and any special circumstances that may justify relief under Chapter 7 bankruptcy. While many of the numbers used are drawn from IRS standard allowances for food, utilities, and similar routine expenses, a person’s actual payments made monthly on secured debts such as mortgages and car loans are included to reduce their income. Generally speaking, if a person has no disposable income remaining at the end of the month after payment of all these standard and actual expenses, they may qualify for Chapter 7.

However, if when the last six months of income is annualized (i.e., doubled) and the person falls above the median income for their household size and state, they are instead steered toward filing Chapter 13, which includes a monthly repayment plan. As of 11/01/2015, the median income in Minnesota for a household of one person is $51,199, for two people $68,515, for three people $80,804, and $98,447 for four people. The median income adjusts at least once per year and these amounts reflect the median income as last adjusted on November 1, 2015 which will again be adjusted in April of 2016.

Even if someone is above the median income for Minnesota, they may still qualify for Chapter 7 (also referred to as “passing the Means Test”) based on other circumstances.

One job of your bankruptcy attorney is to give you all your bankruptcy and non-bankruptcy options, including calculating the Means Test for you and advising you on whether you qualify for Chapter 7 or if you may want or need to file Chapter 13 instead.

Wartchow Law Office is a law firm located in Edina, Minnesota with an exclusive practice in Chapter 7, Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy law, representing individual consumer and business clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and How It Protects You

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) is pro-consumer legislation that was originally enacted in 1978 for the purpose of protecting consumers from the aggressive and sometimes abusive collection tactics often used by third party collection agencies. Among the its lengthy list of prohibited acts and conduct, the FDCPA makes it illegal for debt collectors including collection agencies, lawyers, forms writers and other third party collectors to do the following:

  • State information that is false, deceptive, or misleading
  • Threaten to take any action that cannot legally be taken or that is not intended to be taken
  • State that a legal process such as a lawsuit has begun when in fact it has not
  • Represent that collection documents have been authorized or approved by a court, official, or an agency of the government
  • Threaten to unlawfully repossess property
  • Claim that the consumer has committed a crime
  • Incessantly call on the phone or engage in repeated telephone conversations
  • Call the consumer at their place of employment when the collector knows that the employer prohibits such communications
  • Discuss the debt with a third person, such as an employer or family member
  • Call the consumer if they know they are represented by an attorney

There are several requirements that must be met before a consumer’s claim for an FDCPA violation arises, including that the underlying debt must have been incurred for personal, family or household purposes as opposed to for business reasons. Damages for successful FDCPA violations include up to $1,000 plus the cost of attorney fees for bringing the action. Additional damages may be available if the consumer can prove emotional distress or that they suffered an out of pocket expense due to the violation.

If you believe that you may have a claim under the FDCPA, you should tell your bankruptcy attorney about the claim as this could be a potential asset in your bankruptcy case.

Wartchow Law Office provides free bankruptcy consultations to discuss options in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Minnesota as well as non-bankruptcy debt relief alternatives. Located in Edina, Minnesota, Wartchow Law Office represents clients throughout the Twin Cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul and surrounding areas.